Bamyan in afghanistan predating

The area contains numerous Buddhist monastic ensembles and sanctuaries, as well as fortified edifices from the Islamic period.The site is also testimony to the tragic destruction by the Taliban of the two standing Buddha statues, which shook the world in March 2001.After reportedly earning their fortune of nearly £1 million through a series of small businesses, including inventing a special machine to make fresh tofu, the two decided to pursue their dreams by travelling around the world.They were intentionally dynamited and destroyed in 2001 by the Taliban, on orders from leader Mullah Mohammed Omar, after the Taliban government declared that they were "idols" (which are forbidden under Sharia law)."Perhaps if we blow something up, the world will pay attention to us," many in the province told Al Jazeera.But Zhang Xinyu and Liang Hong, a millionaire couple and full-time adventurers from Beijing, were so moved on hearing about the destruction of the ancient relics that they took it upon themselves to resurrect the statues.Carved into the are the two niches of the giant Buddha statues (55m and 38m high) destroyed by the Taliban in 2001, and numerous caves forming a large ensemble of Buddhist monasteries, chapels and sanctuaries along the foothills of the valley dating from the 3rd to the 5th century C. In several of the caves and niches, often linked by galleries, there are remains of wall paintings and seated Buddha figures.In the valleys of the Bamiyan's tributaries are further groups of caves including the , some 3km south-east of the Bamiyan Cliffs where among the more than one hundred caves dating from the 6th to 13th centuries are fragments of a 10m tall standing Buddha figure and a sanctuary with painted decorations from the Sasanian period.

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Afghanistan is home to over 1500 archaeological sites, and excavations have revealed evidence of both Eastern and Western influences in architecture and material goods.Japan and Switzerland, among others, have pledged support for the rebuilding of the statues., Bamyan was part of the Indian kingdom of Gandhara.It was the site of several Buddhist and Hindu monasteries, and a thriving center for religion, philosophy, and Indo-Greek art.In December, the first commercial flights to Bamiyan hoped to bring tourists from Japan and China to ski the mountains, climb the cliffs that housed what were once the world's largest free-standing Buddhas, and visit the picturesque "red city" of Shahr-e-Zohak.But several hotels in Bamiyan city are closing for the winter because their pipes have frozen over, and the annual snow adds yet another difficulty for the struggling economy.